Le Mans (24hr)

Le Mans (24hr)

The 24 Hours of Le Mans (French: 24 Heures du Mans) is an endurance-focused sports car race held annually near the town of Le Mans, France.[1] It is the world's oldest active endurance racing event.[2] Unlike fixed-distance races whose winner is determined by minimum time, the 24 Hours of Le Mans is won by the car that covers the greatest distance in 24 hours. Racing teams must balance the demands of speed with the cars' ability to run for 24 hours without mechanical failure.[3]

The race is organized by the Automobile Club de l'Ouest (ACO). It is held on the Circuit de la Sarthe, composed of closed public roads and dedicated sections of a racing track. The event represents one leg of the Triple Crown of Motorsport, with the other events being the Indianapolis 500 and the Monaco Grand Prix.

The 24 Hours of Le Mans was frequently part of the World Sportscar Championship from 1953 until that series' final season in 1992. In 2011, it was a part of the Intercontinental Le Mans Cup. Since 2012, the race has been a part of the FIA World Endurance Championship. In World Endurance Championship's super-season of May 2018 to June 2019, the 24 Hours of Le Mans was both the second and the last round of the season.

 

The circuit on which the 24 Hours of Le Mans is run is named the Circuit de la Sarthe, after the department that Le Mans is within. It consists of both permanent track and public roads temporarily closed for the race. Since 1923, the track has been extensively modified, mostly for safety reasons, and now is 13.626 km (8.467 mi) in length. Although it initially entered the town of Le Mans, the track was cut short to better protect spectators. This led to the creation of the Dunlop Curve and Tertre Rouge corners before rejoining the old circuit on the Mulsanne. Another major change was on the Mulsanne itself in 1990 when the FIA decreed that it would no longer sanction any circuit that had a straight longer than 2 km (1.2 mi). To comply with this, two chicanes were added to the 6-kilometre-long (3.7 mi) straight. The addition of the chicanes was further influenced by the fact that the speed of WM P88-Peugeot French driver Roger Dorchy had been timed at 405 km/h (252 mph) during the 1988 race.

Due to the shorter length of the straights, top speeds at Le Mans are now generally around 330 km/h (205 mph).

The public sections of the track differ from the permanent circuit, especially in comparison with the Bugatti Circuit which is inside the Circuit de la Sarthe. Due to heavy traffic, the public roads are not as smooth or well kept. They also offer less grip because of the lack of soft-tyre rubber laid down from racing cars, though this only affects the first few laps of the race. The roads are closed only within a few hours of the practice sessions and the race before being opened again almost as soon as the race is finished. Workers have to assemble and dismantle safety barriers every year for the public sections.

 

Our Track Art are supplied laser cut from 3mm Genuine Perpsex which has a 10 year guarantee against cracking or distortion through sun light and UV Rays. 

 

With a choice of two fixings, you decide whether your Track Art is supplied with chrome stand off brackets (x2 although some tracks have additional). The installation is to simply mark your wall, attach the chrome backing (screws and rawl plug not included) and screw the chrome cap on, trapping the Track Art between. 

Or supplied with no mounting holes and supplied with 3M double sided adhesive blocks which require sticking on the back and trimming to size with scissors or a knife. 

 

Our Track Art is cut from Black Perspex which measures approximately 290m wide by 190mm tall. The actual Track Art will be scaled to best fit these measurements but will not be compacted so as to maintain the original scale. 

 

All our tracks have the race track name and direction of travel engraved on the start / finish straight but you may decide to personalise it as you choose. 

    PriceFrom £16.00